If you think of video files and Cloud storage, your mind will probably jump to slow upload times and costly storage space. This doesn’t have to be the case. Whether you’re looking to share home movie files with family members or are making a slew of promotional videos for your latest client, there’s a backup provider that meets your individual video-related needs – and this list is a good place to start looking!
File backup: If you want to back up only your data (operating systems and programs can be reinstalled, though it’s mildly time- and effort-consuming), a program that backs up just the files you select is a major time-saver. Some programs automatically select the appropriate files if you use the Windows library folders (Documents, Photos, Videos, etc.).

Free or paid, we highly recommend that you back up at least your essential data   against theft, malware or ransomware, and natural disasters, not to mention user error. Even if you work online, a local backup is a lot quicker to restore. And this goes beyond PCs: We get a lot of emails asking how to get data back from a stolen phone—the users generally don’t like the answer. 
It may take some time depending on the number of files you have and the total size. You can use the "Email me when done" option to get notified once the archival completes. You can then download the created archive locally. Make sure to download it to your Google Drive shared folder or copy it there after download so it gets synced and backed up in the cloud.
You can either tear out your hair when a disaster strikes your hard drive or you can prepare for it ahead of time, but data loss is as inevitable as death and taxes. An online backup service is one of the best ways to protect yourself against such threats as a crashed hard drive or accidental deletion. Natural disasters such as fires, floods, and earthquakes can also spell the end of your digital media and documents. Even if you're among the very few who diligently perform local backups at regular intervals, you could still lose data if you don't store backups offsite.
It's been a long time since we last looked at online backup tools, so we figured it was time to take another look. Earlier this week we asked you which online backup services were the best: The ones that offered the most seamless and simple backups, fast and complete restores, easy-to-use backup clients, and of course, storage for your money. You responded with a number of options, but we only have room for your top five. Here they are, in no particular order:

Speed: Speed, in many cases, is far more dependent upon your broadband connection than that of the online service, though the geographical location of the storage and the equipment in between can make a significant difference. Check the location of the data servers if speed is important to you. Or, just give the trial a whirl and see if you can live with it.


This rule, to be carried out this month, applies to all the YouTubers, regardless of their location or their content (even if it is directed towards a mature audience). This sudden declaration has caused quite a big conundrum in the virtual world. According to the rule, YouTube can demonetise the content of YouTubers who fail to follow it and might even get fined.
To protect your channel from COPPA, you can download all videos in the channel to your computer for backup or re-upload them to other platforms. Since online websites do not support batch downloading of videos, and most of them have suspicious and unsafe ads embedded, thus, it is better to use a safe and reliable tool like Jihosoft 4K Video Downloader.
Michael Muchmore is PC Magazine's lead analyst for software and web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazine's coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of web services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazine's Solutions section, which covered programming techniques as well as tips on using popular office software. He previously covered services and software for ExtremeTech.com.
Bitcasa Infinite Drive is relatively new, but it's one of your favorite cloud storage providers in general, mostly because they offer virtually unlimited stroage for syncing and backups. When we say unlimited, we mean it—some of you are using terabytes of storage with Bitcasa. It's not primarily a backup service though, and while it was built for file syncing and storage, the Bitcasa desktop client does support regular file backups. Bitcasa supports Windows and OS X, and encrypts all of your files before uploading so they stay safe from prying eyes. Bitcasa even keeps revision history, so if you've backed up a file multiple times and need an older version, you can pick it out and restore it. Plus, you can use the Bitcasa mobile apps for iOS, Android, and Windows Phone to access your data on the go.
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